Posted by Betsy Graziano on 2/27/2017

Move to anew house and you could step into job security. Relocating when the division you work with moves to a new city or state can signal to your employer that you're dedicated, loyal and steadfast. But, buying a new house solely because your employer is relocating comes with risks. These three points can help to reduce risks associated with buying a new house that's directly linked to a job move.

Job move could lead to a new house

Employment contract - Many jobs are at will, meaning that you can leave the job at anytime. With an at-will job, an employer can also bring your job to an end for any reason, as long as the reason does not violate employment laws. Before you move and buy a new house to follow an employer to another town, check your employment contract. See if your employer will offer you a written, guaranteed bonus if you move. If the bonus covers three months or more of your annual salary, it could give you time to find new employment should you get laid off after you relocate.

Housing assistance - Check with your human resources representative to see if you'll receive housing assistance if you relocate. Generally, the employer must ask you to relocate to get housing assistance. You also may have to move 50 or more miles one way to receive housing assistance. Housing assistance can cover closing costs, transporting your household goods to your new home, temporary housing costs and fees associated with selling your current home. The amount of housing assistance that an employer offers varies. Get a good housing assistance package with your relocation and you could significantly trim the amount of money you spend out-of-pocket on your move. Get all housing assistance agreements in writing.

Buying a new house due to a job move requires honesty

Ripple effects of moving to a new house - Move to a new house and you're children could be forced to go to a new school, you could put hundreds of miles between your family and you could have to learn a new culture. You could also have to get accustomed to a new climate. Reduce the risks of moving to a new house during a job relocation by talking openly with your family, including your young children, about the move. Get everyone in your family's buy-in. Also, ask your employer and human resources representative how your role will change after you relocate. If possible, negotiate a move when interest rates are low and the costs of houses in the area you're moving to are low to competitive.

Pack and move when your employer ask you to work in a division that's moving to a different region of the country and you could forego a layoff. The fact that your employer ask you to move is a sign that your employer values your talent.Another way that your employer values your talent is to offer you relocation assistance. Accept this assistance before you agree to move. It could save you closing costs, equity and help with your down payment.




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Posted by Betsy Graziano on 1/2/2017

The real estate market is filled with many high-quality residences, and after a comprehensive search, you've found a residence that fits your personal needs and budget perfectly. However, you may need to think twice before you submit an offer on this residence. There are many factors that homebuyers should consider before they make an offer on a house, including: 1. Neighborhood Ideally, you'll want to find a home in a community filled with friendly neighbors. But in many cases, homebuyers may focus exclusively on a residence and ignore the neighborhood entirely. Taking a walk around a neighborhood often allows you to get a better feel about what it is like to live in a neighborhood and may give you a chance to meet some of the neighbors as well. Also, a simple walk around the block will provide you with a better idea about whether a house's value may rise or fall in the foreseeable future. For instance, a neighborhood filled with houses with well-maintained front lawns, nearby parks and schools and other local amenities may prosper for years to come, and home values may rise in this neighborhood over the next few years. 2. Crime No one wants to live in an unsafe area, and you can learn about crime near a prospective home before you submit an offer on a residence. Contacting a local police station usually is a great idea for homebuyers who want to find out about crime statistics in a particular area. Furthermore, your real estate agent can provide insights into crime in a specific area and help you determine whether a particular house is the best option. 3. Traffic Although your dream home features all of the amenities you want, it might fail to provide you with quick, easy access to your office day after day. For example, traffic can be a problem if your house is located in or near a major city. And if you need to travel to work every day, it is important to understand how traffic could affect your daily commute. To better understand traffic patterns in a particular area, try driving to a residence at different times during the day. By doing so, you can learn about traffic patterns near a house and be better equipped to make a more informed decision about whether to submit an offer on a residence. 4. Taxes You've been pre-approved for a mortgage and have established a monthly budget for a new home, but taxes may vary depending on where you move. Thus, you'll want to learn as much as possible about potential taxes that you could face at a new residence before you submit an offer. Taxes may add up quickly, but homebuyers who budget accordingly can minimize the risk that they'll fall behind on tax bills. And with support from your real estate agent, you can learn about taxes that you may encounter if you purchase a particular residence. If you're fully satisfied with a residence after you consider the aforementioned factors, you'll be ready to submit an offer and move one step closer to moving into your dream house.





Posted by Betsy Graziano on 12/5/2016

Tiny houses are all the rage. There are even multiple shows on HGTV based solely on tiny houses. So why is there so much hype around this type of home? And is it just a fad or are tiny homes here to stay? A tiny house is somewhere between 100 and 400 square feet. Some tiny homes have a loft bedroom while some keep it on the main floor. For added living space, some tiny homes have an outdoor shower and toilet. They also contain a small kitchen and living room area. There is very minimal storage in tiny homes (obviously). Tiny houses are on wheels so you can travel with your home or buy/rent a plot of land to keep it on. Let’s take a look at why tiny homes are so popular. Simplistic life: As detailed above, tiny homes are, as the name suggests, tiny. And with that comes a simplistic life. You cannot have bounds of ‘things’ as there is just not enough storage. Therefore, tiny homes bring you back to the basics, just the necessities. This is often an important reason why many are transitioning to tiny homes. So many live too large with too much stuff and at some point it just becomes too much. More money for experiences: There are countless people living paycheck to paycheck and a large majority of that has to do with their mortgage. Even the smallest homes can cost between $100,000 to $150,000, but many tiny homes range between $35,000 and $75,000. Purchasing a tiny home will leave you with a smaller mortgage and therefore more disposable income to spend on life experiences or even saving for retirement. Who doesn’t want to travel to world rather than sitting in your home for the rest of your life because all of your money went to paying for it? More free time: With a drastically smaller space than normal homes that leaves you with less cleaning and maintenance. Therefore, leaving you with more time in life to do other things. Also, since you have a much smaller mortgage you may not need to work that 60-hour corporate job anymore. You can take a much less demanding job or career, working fewer hours and making less money, but having the additional time to really experience life. So what do you think? Do you think you could see yourself living in a tiny home?




Tags: Buying a home   home   tiny houses  
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Posted by Betsy Graziano on 11/21/2016

Let's face it – paying monthly rent for your tiny apartment is no longer feasible. Instead, you need a bigger place to live, i.e. a house that you can enjoy for years to come. As a first-time homebuyer, exploring the real estate market may sound like a fun, exciting opportunity – and it is! However, you need to prepare for the housing market, and by doing so, you'll be able to improve your chances of finding your dream residence quickly and effortlessly. So what does it take to find the right home? Here are three ways to boost your chances of buying your ideal house: 1. Save Money Before You Buy a Home. You'll likely need to find a lender that can offer you a mortgage with an interest rate that fits your budget. And if you save money before you buy a house, you could improve your chances of getting a mortgage with a lower interest rate. Typically, having enough money to cover several months worth of a home's mortgage may make you a better candidate for a mortgage than other potential homebuyers. It also is important to keep in mind that saving money now may help you pay closing costs and other fees that frequently arise during the homebuying process. 2. Look at Both Your Income and Debt. Ideally, you'll want to establish a budget as you prepare to explore the real estate market, as this will allow you to determine which houses you can afford. When you create your budget, be sure to consider both your annual income and outstanding debt as well. Evaluating these factors will enable you to better understand your yearly expenses and ensure you're able to search for homes that fit your budget perfectly. Don't forget to consider your future earnings as you develop your budget, too. For instance, if you're a student who already has a job lined up after graduation, you may be able to handle a larger monthly mortgage payment. On the other hand, if you have a baby on the way, you may want to account for the expenses associated with a newborn as you pursue a residence. 3. Monitor Your Credit Score. For homebuyers, your credit score reigns supreme in the eyes of lenders. Thus, spending some time monitoring and improving your credit score may make it easier for you to move one step closer to landing your dream house. Remember, you're eligible to receive a free copy of your credit report from each of the three major credit reporting agencies (Equifax, Experian and Trans Union) annually. And if you review a copy of this report, you can understand where your credit score currently stands. If your credit score is low, you can improve it by paying off any outstanding debt. Furthermore, if you find an error in your credit report, be sure to notify the agency that provided the report to you to ensure you can fix this mistake; otherwise, the error could impact your ability to buy a house. Being a first-time homebuyer sometimes can be challenging. But if you use the aforementioned tips, you may be able to bolster your chances of purchasing your dream residence.





Posted by Betsy Graziano on 9/26/2016

If there was ever a time to purchase real estate it is now. A unique combination of circumstances makes buying a home a no-brainer. Here are five reasons why you should buy a home NOW...   1. Houses are more affordable 2. Historically low mortgage rates 3. Prices are stable 4. Home ownership is the path to independence and wealth 5. Owning a home gives you pride of ownership Call today to find out what homes are available in your price range or do a quick search to look for homes and create a profile on this site to save your favorites.







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